Month: April 2018

Suboxone Clinics Maryland – New Approach To Opiate Addiction

We are Proud to Open Our New Suboxone Clinic Finding a suboxone clinic in the Baltimore area can be difficult because some aren’t accepting new patients and others only take private health insurance. Our program welcomes new patients and people with any kind on insurance, even state Medicaid. We pride ourselves on offering effective treatment overseen by a licensed doctor and we will never fail to help those who come to us in need. How we use suboxone effectively: Once you’ve made the choice to find a healthcare provider for suboxone treatment, you should know not all providers can prescribe it. Only about 35,064 doctors are currently trained and certified to prescribe suboxone out of 800,000 physicians in the United States. Our program only uses physicians who have gone through the proper...

Ketamine gaining popularity for depression therapy and addiction recovery

Medical professionals call it ‘off-label’ prescription when using Ketamine to gain ground on addiction and depression. It may seem counter-intuitive to use an often-abused drug, ketamine, to conquer a mood disorder – or especially treat addiction to other drugs. First, there has to be an understanding of the properties of ketamine to reduce the stigma of the drug and grasp the prescribing environment. Off-label uses of drugs are uses that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Ketamine is, by label, an anesthetic developed in the 1960’s. It’s a Schedule III drug approved for hospital use in liquid or powder form. It was created for use in the Vietnam War to operate on or treat injuries on the front line. It acts fast to dull pain. Shedding the s...

Look What Dragged the Cat In: the rise of an opioid crisis

Excerpted from the 2018 book, Look What Dragged the Cat In, available October 2018 The decade of the 2010’s shelled hospitals and first responders with an explosion of opioid-related illness, injury, and death. Preventable drug overdoses tallied 54,793 lives lost in 2016 – an increase of 391 percent since 1999. Accidental drug overdose deaths increased 327 percent over the same period. The majority of OD deaths (38,000) involve opioids, The drug category most frequently involved in opioid overdoses and growing at the fastest pace includes fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and tramadol. The fentanyl category of opioids accounted for nearly half of opioid-related deaths. The dirty cat in the litter, heroin, accounted for the second highest number of deaths, claiming 14,606 lives. America str...

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